How to Make an Easy Planting Box if You're Bad with Tools

I love gardening, and my goal is to try and grow at least 50% of all of the fruits and veggies that we eat. However, I have three limitations, space, a digging dog, and I'm not that skilled at carpintery. Because of this, I had to look for creative solutions. My first idea started as a pallet garden. Please note, a reader warned me recently that some pallets, due to the use of pesticides and chemicals, may not be safe for gardening. So, before you pick up just any old pallet, make sure to do a little research. I read several articles online and found this one to be very comprehensive: http://www.1001pallets.com/pallet-safety/.

I looked online and solicited the help of my daughter. Our design was very simple and required a pallet, some sanding, and landscaping fabric. We sanded the pallet and used a staple gun to attach several layers of landscaping fabric on the back and bottom. My intention was to lean it against the wall. Pallet Garden 1.0 looked like this:
Leaning Garden
You can see the dirt on the ground. That is why this version failed. As much as I tried to keep it packed in, it would fall out when I watered and eventually became a management mess. So, I purchased two saw horses and laid the pallet garden flat. Version 2.0 looks like this:




It expands the growing space since I can use the boards for pots and planting bags in addition to the actual pallet garden. The garden also sits high off of the ground. So, curious dogs that love dirt can't reach. The disadvantages of this method are that it is not easy to move. The pallet is heavy and requires three people, two to hold the pallet and one to move the saw horses. The dirt in the pallet beds is not very deep so you can't plant anything that requires a deeper root structure. I have found basil, other herbs and flowers are happy in the actual pallet part of the garden. In the bags and pots, I have beans, garlic, carrots and onion. 

My second planting area is a planting box. I don't have neither a way to haul huge boards nor a saw. So, for this one I asked the individual at Home Depot to cut the boards for me. I purchased 2x10 boards and had him cut 4-5ft sections and 4-3ft. sections. In the corners I used 4x4 posts. I asked him to cut 4-2ft pieces. I purchased #14-3 inch wood screws and a 1/4 drill bit for pilot holes. I did not want any chemicals near my veggies. So, I left the wood natural. I realize that will shorten the life of the wood, but the whole project cost me less than 80.00. By my calcuations, it will last long enough to get my money's worth. I tried to take several photos so you see how simple it is to put together. I did staple landscape cloth to the bottom to keep weeds from growing up into the planter.  

Images of the box are below. This planter has made a wonderful place for deep rooted veggies as well as herbs. I added the green plastic fence because of my dog. Even though I made it extra high, he still found a way to jump in and dig. So, that piece not necessary if your dog has better manners than mine. (sigh)

I used two screws per board to drill the boards into the 4x4 post





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